Muse. A artist loft in Woodstock, Cape Town

Muse - An artist loft in Woodstock

Muse Location, is a magnificent art filled Loft in a trendy up and coming area of Cape town. This location offers a great vantage point from which to take in the magnificent views that stretch across the city toward the harbour on the one side and toward Table Mountain behind you. Sitting proud atop what used to be a textile factory in the meat packing district of Woodstock and what is now a trendy and creative space housing businesses as well as residential spaces, Muse Location is in her element.

Woodstock came to be in the decade post 1900, and was always a "grey area" that remained unconquered by the group areas act. A certain Bohemianism has remained here, together with a wonderful mix of cultures now from traditional Muslim families to hipsters, creatives to cafe owners and a hundred plus, main road furniture and decor stores.

Massive Steel framed windows frame the space between interior and exterior, allowing beautiful natural light to flood the space. With a square meterage of around 250m2 ,the industrial architecture design  mixed with an eclectic decor style makes for an interesting and exciting apartment. The large open plan space with polished black screed floors is separated into various areas using unusual, one of a kind items of furniture. Many of these items are created by the owners themselves, or adapted to be functional within this environment. The owner, an avid fine art collector, has found a space here where his growing art collection can truly sing and where his wonderful and unusual furniture finds can be repurposed in a suburb where conformity is frowned upon and creativity celebrated.

An absolute passion for art is apparent in this gorgeous space, with a myriad of fantastic art works begging for your attention. In every nook and around every corner you will spot visual treats.

Both stills and film shoots are welcome at Muse.

Muse is also open to short stay accommodation bookings.

 

 


The Glasshouse at Le Jardin

Le Jardin - A Wonderland in Stellenbosch

 

Step into a bygone era, a wonderland where time stands still. Current owners, Sue and Bernard, bought this expansive Stellenbosch property almost two decades ago,and with the help of architect Gerrit van der Wolf, transformed it into a fun and exciting land to be explored by child and adult alike.

The elegant Sir Herbert Baker style house is reminiscent of an era when life was slower, lunches were languid and everyone played croquet!

Apart from the work on the main house, Gerrit was commissioned with building a glass house, a sort of 'ode, to Bernard's love of old fashioned conservatories.'

True to the whimsical feeling of this location, a huge, ancient oak, bursts through the top of the glass roof,as though the 'Alice' of this story.

Beautiful, rolling, manicured lawns roll up to the buildings- and lead to pathways surrounded by foliage and interspersed with beautiful Alice in Wonderland characters, fashioned by Streetwise. Follow the paths and you end up on the wooden decking overlooking an eco dam. The Manor House at  is surrounded by lavender fields and rose gardens. Tree walks and a kiddies zipline add further delight to this magnificent property.A most beautiful and magical location for both film and stills shoots.

  • Glass house conservatory at LE JARDIN
 

 

 


CAPE COD Deconstructing Architecture and Design Styles

The White House - Shoot my House - Yserfontein
The White House - A gorgeous example of Cape Cod architecture.

We provide locations for film and stills shoots, and as such need to emulate many of the styles that are popular overseas or at least find essential elements of them within the houses that we represent in order to sell the style. A thorough understanding of the defining element of a style is therefore crucial. In this blog we deconstruct CAPE COD.

A quintessentially American style, developed by early English settlers in the 1600s. Partially inspired by the simple, thatched cottages common in Britain, the settlers adapted the style to keep out the harsh New England winter. These houses are essentially beach houses designed for the harsh New England climate.

Cape Cod architecture home

Originally quite simple and inexpensive starter homes, elements of the style have been copied to create more modern CAPE COD homes that are anything but inexpensive in areas such as Marthas Vineyard and The Hamptons and of course right here in Cape Town and surrounds.

Cape Cod style Home

Key defining elements are:
  • A large central chimney located directly behind the front door.
  • Steep roof. Cape Cods have steep roofs to quickly shed rain and snow.
  • Windows and dormers. A full Cape has two windows on each side of the door, and often has a dormer on each side of the chimney to open up the attic.
  • Captain's stairway. was accessed by a narrow stair, or 'captain's stairway,' which has incredibly steep risers and shallow treads to minimize the use of the first-floor space.
  • Shingle siding. Weathered gray shingles (what we call clapperboard) are one of the most recognizable elements of a classic Cape Cod, but newer homes are built of brick, stucco and stone.

Screen Shot 2018-08-27 at 06.18.33

This example of Cape Cod architecture was immortalized by the hit movie SOMETHING'S GOTTA GIVE, home of the playwright played by Diane Keaton, and is probably the example of CAPE COD that most of us think of when bringing the style to mind.

Cape Cod interiors have modernized enormously since the first homes were created in the 17th century - creating large open plan living areas and morphing into 2 and 3 storey homes with a much larger footprint. The classic Beach element of what we think of as essential Cape Cod remains and is beautifully illustrated in the following examples.

The components are:

  • The use of white or off white for interiors and cabinetry - creating a fresh and beach cottage type style.
  • Classic lines in kitchen, bedroom and living rooms furnishings with soft elements which create a coziness against the harsh winter environment
  • wrap around porches with day bed.
  • wooden shutters
  • wooden flooring
  • central fireplaces
  • wooden staircases
  • French doors
  • Use of blue as an accent colour to reinforce the beach theme. Often Duck egg and french blue in soft furnishings and even cabinetry.
  • use of stripes, delicate florals or nautical designs on upholstery.
  • Overstuffed sofas, loveseats and chairs and painted wicker and slip-covered furniture enhances the casual, laid-back vibe of a coastal, Cape Cod cottage.
  • Wood furniture painted in bright pastel colors or white or stained with a natural finish gives the home a welcoming feel. Early American furniture styles, such as ladder-back dining chairs with rush seats, Windsor chairs, farmhouse and trestle dining tables, and step-back cupboards, give the home a traditional look.
  • Traditional lantern lighting - wall, hanging, table or outdoor.

Thanks to :
Liz Gray - Cape Cod Architecture
Julia of Hooked on Houses
Twineinteriors.blogspot
Lacy Morris of ElleDecor


Decoding Chairs - A guide to where to place your Derriere!

There as many chair designs out there as there are stars in the firmament it seems some days, and each has a fabulous and often unspellable name.

Here is a brief guide to decoding some of the particularly popular lovelies that we often see but may not know the name or story behind.

The Acapulco Chair 

First created in Mexico in the 1950's the exact details of its design and designer are unknown.Rumor has it, a French tourist was lounging on a rooftop on a hot afternoon. He became unsatisfied with the sweltering heat and had an idea. He decided to make a chair using the stringed construction of traditional Mayan hammocks. From this, the Acapulco chair was born.

The unique design is easily recognizable and can now be seen on balconies and patio’s across the world. Acapulco chairs were originally made using steel and plastic. Bright colours are a trademark of this chair with modern replicas tweaking the design to include rocking varieties and a host of other deviations.

Acapulco Chairs creating a happy summer retro vibe at House Hugo
Acapulco Chairs creating a happy summer retro vibe at House Hugo - Shoot My House

The Eames Lounge Chair and Ottoman

Created by Charles and Ray Eames in the 1950's (a good time for furniture design it appears!!) for the Herman Miller Furniture company. The Eames Lounge Chair and ottoman are made of molded plywood and leather. They are officially titled Eames Lounge (670) and Ottoman (671) and were released in 1956 after years of

Eames Lounge and Ottoman at AI - Shoot My House
Eames Lounge and Ottoman at AI - Shoot My House

development by designers. It was the first chair that the Eameses designed for a high-end market. Examples of these furnishings are part of the permanent collection of New York's Museum of Modern Art.This luxury item was inspired by the traditional English Club Chair. Charles's vision was for a chair with "the warm, receptive look of a well-used first baseman's mitt." The Eames Lounge Chair is an icon of Modern style design

Charles and Ray (short for Bernice Alexandra "Ray" Kaiser Eames )were an American design married couple who made significant historical contributions to the development of modern architecture and furniture. They also worked in the fields of industrial and graphic design, fine art, and film.

The Ghost Chair

Such an interesting story behind this chair design!! The story of the Louis Ghost Chair, as it’s named, begins with Louis XVI. As in the king of France. During the reign of the 19-year-old monarch and his better half, Marie Antoinette, a renewed interested in classical Greek and Roman design developed, which manifested itself in all sorts of trendy architectural and interior design elements throughout the king’s reign. One such furnishing—a chair with a rectangular or round upholstered back, clean lines, column-like carved legs, and an exposed wood frame—had staying power, eventually earning the name of the monarch, becoming known as the Louis XVI Chair. This formal upholstered chair remains a timeless classic. Then along came a French designer named Philippe Starke (a school dropout known for his cheeky and subversive design)

Shoot My House - Amanzi - ghost chairs
Exemplifying the indoor outdoor versatility of the Ghost Chair at Shoot My House's Amanzi

It was only fitting that Starck would be daring enough to mess with royal style. In 2002 he reinvented the classic Louis XVI armchair for Italian design company Kartell,  The designer distilled the antique furniture piece down into one silhouette, translating its round, medallion-shaped backrest, curved arms, and straight legs into a single clear plastic chair. Calling upon not only the reign of Louis XVI, but on ancient Greek geometry, the chair was a triumph of postmodern times. One of the greatest features of the Ghost Chair is how it’s made. The iconic chair required significant technical innovation: It’s made of a transparent injection-molded polycarbonate, which uses a single mold. This means that the entire chair is just one piece—no screws, upholstery, or separate arms and legs. Because it’s plastic, and because there are no joints (which could freeze or crack in the rain or cold), it does particularly well outdoors. So, it is an indoor/outdoor chair and has even become a popular child's must have item (with a few variations)

The Egg

Designed by Arne Jacobsen in Denmark 1958 specifically for the SAS Royal hotel in Copenhagen, along with many other pieces of furniture that have now found big lives of their own outside the hostelry. His clever pop interpretation of a traditional armchair is all curves and fluidity, soft and sexy. It also creates a sort of cozy cocoon of privacy, especially if you swivel it away from someone you want to ignore or mute.

Screen Shot 2018-07-06 at 06.48.18

 

B32 Cesca and Wassily Chairs

Designed by Marcel Breuer in Germany in 1928 These two designs are important milestones in the history of modern furniture  Fascinated by bicycle handlebars, Breuer and Mart Stam used non-reinforced tubular steel to pretty much invent the 20th-century modern chair. Though the Wassily is more sculptural, more abstract and complicated, the B32/Cesca was the real game changer: It offered a comfortable bounce and seemed to float a human being on air. As if all that weren't enough, Breuer also designed the former Whitney Museum in New York, now known in respect as the Met Breuer.

 

 

Transat

Designed by Eileen Gray in France in 1927 and based on the deck chairs of steamships, this piece gets its name from the abbreviation for “transatlantic.” The frame has complicated joinery with chromed brackets, while the seat is a sling with a pivoting head-support section.

Screen Shot 2018-07-06 at 06.44.44
Transat Design
Screen Shot 2018-07-06 at 06.44.20
Transat Chair - Eileen Gray

 

In an era dominated by male designers, each one of Gray's designs is exceptional and worthy of study and collecting; her Dragons armchair, designed circa 1917, once belonged to Yves Saint Laurent and Pierre Bergé and sold at auction in 2009 for a whopping $27.8 million. Still the most expensive chair ever sold in the world.

So if you're feeling particularly flush this month - there she is. The Dragon Armchair!!

Dragon Chair - Eileen Gray
Dragon Chair - Eileen Gray

There are a million more I'd like to explore by important designers like Mies Van der Rohe, Le Corbusier etc - another day.

These are some of my favourites though i think I can probably skip the price tag on the Dragon Chair - well this year anyway....

thanks to:

https://www.hermanmiller.com/products/seating/lounge-seating/eames-lounge-chair- and-ottoman/

https://www.gq.com/story/the-12-most-iconic-chairs-of-all-time

https://www.decaso.com/blog/ghost-chair-history/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_and_Ray_Eames


Your Own mini meadow in the city. Magnificent!

[houzz=https://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/104014041/list/how-to-have-your-own-mini-wildflower-meadow-in-the-city w=300]

Inspired by all things English today thanks to another royal wedding - plus just love the idea of a meadow in the city. Gravel paths also such a great idea to keep our gardens waterwise and they have a certain romanticism about them that is just so gorgeous.


Simplicity

If one word could sum up the last few years i would say that word would be OVERWHELM.

Tres Chic

It's gotten to the point where i have to have 2 strong coffees before i have the courage to face my inbox. In the summer months upwards of 300 emails fly in there a day not to mention my personal inbox which is filled daily with online courses, ways of making money, ads, letters announcing the fortune i have received from long lost cousins and aunts, uncles and other family members - all mysteriously from the USA where we have no connection or family. you get the picture. our mailboxes are stuffed full with magazines we never read, neighberhood rags that trees are cut down for, special offers, broadsheets, estate agent pamphlets.

In our homes piles of things lie around that we are afraid to get rid of but never look at, clothing fills our cupboards that we may wear one day in the future even though we have never worn them before except in the change room in 1995 - and all the while our living spaces are getting smaller and smaller as the cost of living in big cities rises by the day.

I've just finished  Ellen DeGeneres' hilarious book entitled  "Seriously, I'm kidding"   in which she describes the various items that her mother packed up to move with in 2010 - they includes VHS tapes some unopened of various ab exercise programs, a set of cookie cutters from the late 1950's and other items that had me crying with laughter in my car because of the hilarity of it and because i have some of those items too.

The madness must end. Is the opposite of this a sparten existence? Should we be striving for that or can we settle on simplicity?  The idea that everything has a place and everything in its place and that everything that is in your space is purposely chosen to be there - its not there by happenstance. Living purposefully, mindfully and how it flows over into the choices we make within our most private spaces. that sounds a bit wierd but you know what i mean. Our homes environments. I like that idea and so was delighted to find a book on interior design by that name. Because if there is one thing i CANNOT bring myself to stop hording its books and magazines. its a sickness people!

The great joy of my job is seeing the cool spots that people call home but even better meeting the awesome people who have made those homes awesome. For example the talented Beate who calls BAREFOOT home. Beate is an interior designer (which you can see when you look at her home)

"the practise of subtraction" - using three components in a space instead of Ten requires that any of those three items are far more consequential in impact than any of the ten.

Barefoot
Barefoot has a paired down interior to give every element more weight and meaning.

 

Simplicity doesnt have to mean spartan spaces - What it does require is balance and a sense of order whether that is through repetition, duplication and proportion as in Country Life

In a completely different sort of space House Hugo - the same rules are applied - using repetition of colour to achieve extraordinary effect.

 

Silver Villa uses oversized light fittings to manipulate scale and proportion as well as repetition of wooden elements to tie the different seating together and the room as a whole together

Enigma Mansion uses texture and pattern to create an overall harmony of design. Check out the silk wallcoverings and the opulent velvet upholstery.

So to sum up - Simplicity- as it relates to interiors requires that you practise

  • The practise of subtraction - each element be carefully "curated"  NO Abritrary clutter allowed.
  • Repetition - repeting elements of colour, or texture, material , pattern or shape to create a cohesive whole (Not all these elements!!!)
  • Proportion - playing with oversized pieces in small spaces or vice versa to manipulate scale and proportion.

We are so inspired by our homeowners magnificent spaces and are intrigued by how they express themselves and their individuality in the homes that they inhabit. We love to share the beautiful ways that they live with you. We would love to hear what you think.

with love

Jeanne

 

 

 


New Year - New interior Inspiration!

I dont know about you, but in our world, things are ramping up for a big spring market!! So I thought I would share a few design tips and trends for the New Year…. Please remember, not all of this applies if you are selling a home. It is great to incorporate some things, especially […]

via Happy 2018!!! —


The New Tropical Obsession and How I met India Hicks

Its november, the sun has returned, days are longer and for the last few days the wind has been pumping. yes its early summer in Cape Town.
Each season we are all breathless for what the fashionistas will  prescribe as the overwhelmingly popular look for interiors and exteriors for the season. This season it feels like a lot of tropical, Bahama inspired chillaxing. Inspired, in part no doubt, by the very popular seried Blood Line set in the Florida Keys (if you havent watched this series yet on netflix you simply must immediately!).


Huge palm trees and even huger white balconies and verandahs that you can imagine drinking home made lemonade on abound, and  so it was that one late friday afternoon i met India hicks via a rather lovely client of mine. I was lying on the couch when she came into my life - it was late friday-  more evening than afternoon, and i wasn't particularly well dressed, which is embarrassing when meeting an heir to the Britishthrone. Shes 678th in line so i guess i can chill out a bit about that. Anyhoo, there is was. "Do you know India Hicks?" my client asked. Indi who? was my inane response and then there she was in all her Bahamaian glory with the breathlessly chic yet relaxed home and easy breezy southern style that you gotta love, staring out at me from the pages of google as if to say "how could you have not known about me. Shame on you" Shame on me indeed...

As Interiors Online put it "There’s no disputing the pedigree of British-born designer India Hicks. Daughter of interior designer David Nightingale Hicks, she was a bridesmaid for Princess Diana and Prince Charles, an international fashion model, and developed luxury fragrances and product lines for Crabtree and Evelyn. With three published interior design books inspired by her island lifestyle in the Bahamas, India Hicks is also a well-respected designer. With a relaxed coastal-chic style that blends her tropical island lifestyle with colonial elements, India incorporates soft natural materials of paper, wood and straw with muted tones for a calming effect. She layers eccentric objects, pictures and momentos to create a layered, liveable home that encompasses a definite British flavour with a strong sense of individuality."
And then, as we do, I started searching through my locations for homes that exude a similar sensibility and elements of the style. Immediately I knew I had my very own India Hicks in the form of my BFF. As leggy as India, as helplessly, yet casually stylish and her beautiful home in Stanford - Country Life. Roz creates little pockets of interest all over the house that have me oohing and aahing as i walk around. A flair, no a talent  inherited from her darling mom, she has created a space so extraordinary and yet so unfussy and so impossibly stylish.
 
 

Other beauiful properties on our books that exude this sensibility are:
 
Misty Beach
Misty Beach captures the easy living southern style

Screen Shot 2017-11-08 at 6.49.37 AMScreen Shot 2017-11-08 at 6.48.45 AMScreen Shot 2017-11-08 at 6.48.26 AMScreen Shot 2017-11-08 at 6.47.57 AM
Image refs:
Bungalow blue interiors
Interiors online
Shoot my House
Perfect Hideaways
 
 
 


Creating an Inspiring Work Space

A home office can be one of the most important rooms in a house, but it often gets overlooked. As a place of work, home offices are often cold, bland and uninspired. Here’ are a few tips on how to make a more creative, inspiring and productive space. Lighting Getting adequate lighting is essential to […]

via How To Make Your Home Office More Inspiring — Eve Morgan Interiors


A Home What really matters - Flowers

A very very wise man once said that "After women, flowers are the most lovely thing that God has given the world" Well thank you Mr Dior, there is no doubt you are very astute and that we are very lovely indeed, but enough about us girls and more about flowers...
Flowers uplift any space and take it from drab and lifeless to beautiful without airs and graces - bunches of flowers can be simple or extremely sophisticated depending on the occassion and the personality of the floweree (new word meaning person who has the flowers in their space)  The current trends toward less structured arrangements and toward field flowers and arrangements in monotone or "dirty" colours, using flowers only locally grown are all exciting trends to look at. so lets look already and stop gabbing.
These are the top trends for 2017 according to Country Living

  1. Dahlias - with so many varieties Dahlias can be very versatle and are hugely popular right now. The most popular colours this year being dusty pinks, peaches and cream and creamy colours. Here they are mixed with Peonies my absolute favourite flowers.

Screen Shot 2017-09-22 at 5.14.01 AM
2. Hanging Arrangements - to be seen EVERYWHERE these are so magnificent - everything from hanging hoops to elaborate rectanglar constructions, deconstructed hanging air plants - these are such big news and lift the eye creating so much space. To be seen in the magnificent Babylonstoren wedding venues - they are a super hot trend and hopefully will be for a long time to come.


3. Farm Fresh Flowers - Like the food to table trend in fresh produce we're seeing the same trend in flowers, with local varietes that do not have to travel great distances being the preferred blooms.  It seems illogical to trade a massive carbon footprint for cut flowers that are already 5 days old at least when you buy them. This means we're looking at locally sourced varieties that are seasonal. A refreshing and earth friendly trend!
Screen Shot 2017-09-26 at 6.20.13 AM

4. Red Wine Hues  - Lots of deep wine tones to be seen in arrangements from cabernet to pinot noir and burgendy which all couple nicely with more delicate jewelled tones and softer pastels.

 Screen Shot 2017-09-26 at 6.21.08 AM
5. Tropical Plants and Green Arrangements - we have seen a huge increase this year in stills companies requesting tropical plant locations and everywhere we're seeing enormous vases filled entirely and to great effect with Elephant Ears or delicious monster leaves. Tall architectural fronds of Arumlilies are also magnificent in oversized simple glass vases. Simple, and yet they create such a statement AND they last for weeks with minimal requirements except water and to be kept out of direct sunlight.
Screen Shot 2017-10-02 at 5.56.51 AM.pngScreen Shot 2017-10-02 at 6.15.31 AM
6. Green arrangements - following on from this is the trend toward arrangements made solely of foliage. keeping costs down substantially you can make stuning arranagement with plants such a slaender, rosemary, olive branches as well as lots of wonderful varieties of fynbos if you're lucky enough to live in the Cape.


7. Muddy Colours - Arrangements in toned down muddy, " dirty" colours continue to be popular and counter balance with the softer buttery hues that are also big news this year as well as the stunning Dusty rose which is a toned down version of the soft pastel pink.Magnificent in roses and peonies.

8. Combining Sculptural vegetable elements with flowers and foliage - Beautiful artichoke heads, Turnips, red cabage, Kale combined with more traditional flowers and foliage make a remarkable arrangement.